designer spotlight – thornback & peel at SMUG

:: by Lizzie
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Thornback & Peel is a design studio, based in Bloomsbury London, founded by Juliet Thornback and Delia Peel. I’ve been a fan of their beautiful screen-printed wares for some time and am pretty sure that SMUG has stocked their tea towels ever since we opened our doors back in 2009.

 

The best thing that’s come out of working with Delia and Juliet, is undoubtably the Guinea Pig and Pineapple exclusives collection we’ve developed together for SMUG. Thornback & Peel are a joy to work with and I’ve loved getting to know them and their team over the years. Our Guinea Pig logo which Thornback & Peel redrew for the collaboration, appears on tea towels, aprons, oven gloves, napkins and hankies. The addition of the Pineapple design which ultimately inspired the Guinea and Pineapple combo pattern has been a huge success and is a firm favourite with SMUG customers. You can see the full collection here.

 

Our big news for Spring is that the Guinea Pig and Pineapple combo Tea Towel and Apron are now both available in the new Mint and Pale Blue colour-way, pictured below. To learn more about what makes Juliet and Delia tick, as well as a bit about their backgrounds and inspirations, then read on for a mini interview as part of my designer spotlight series.

 

 

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Tell us a bit about each of your backgrounds and how you came to be doing what you’re doing now.

Thornback & Peel was created after we were introduced by a very clever friend who sensed that we shared a fascination for the eccentric and surreal. I (Delia Peel) was working as a set designer at the Royal Court and Juliet (Thornback) as a florist, but at the time we met we were both looking to create a business by making something ourselves. I lived around the corner from Covent garden flower market where we would meet at the crack of dawn for a sausage sandwich and a cup of very strong tea to plan our collections. The business began in that café and on our kitchen tables. Eventually we graduated to a tiny studio space in Deptford with a desk as our print table and a few years later into the studio we’re in now in Bloomsbury.

 

What are you most inspired by and which key elements of the Thornback and Peel studio most resonate with your personally?

Our studio is a happily buzzing workspace. The office, designing, printing and packing all happen in the same place. The print table dominates with a bank of computers for all the behind the scenes work. We print our handkerchiefs on site, so you’ll typically see tins of sardines being carefully screen-printed and laid out side by side, while the new design ideas cover the walls – hand-drawn ideas, inspiration and colour tests all go up side by side. Organised chaos.

We like to draw on British humour in our designs – looking back to literary references often from the stories we loved as children and still tell our own children today. We like to update classic ideas and by playing with colour, form and scale produce prints with a little charm from the past. With sources of inspiration including Mrs Beeton’s household management, 17th Century microscope imagery of the natural world to Alice in Wonderland.

 

If you each had to choose one SMUG product to have what would it be?

Peel: I adore the Thornback & Peel X SMUG collection, working with Lizzie is really fun. The guinea pig and pineapple combo is one of my all time favourite designs, but I already have it at home! So it would be the Bonne Maison Fruits socks.

Thornback: Alex Munroe’s Lobster necklace (we love these curious sea creatures – they have been in our collection in one way or another since we began 10 years ago. We have woven them into an all over print in this Spring’s collection.)

 

 

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designer spotlight – tom pigeon for SMUG

:: by Lizzie
Tom Pigeon Summer 2014_05_cropped_web_

 

Tom Pigeon is a small design studio, based on the East coast of Scotland, founded by Pete and Kirsty Thomas in 2014. SMUG has been stocking and enjoying their work for some time now. Last year I commissioned them to rework one of my own patterns to produce a collection of SMUG exclusive brass foiled notebooks. We’re also lucky enough to share a joint exclusive with Tom Pigeon on their limited run of Metallic Letterpress Number Prints.

 

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Metallic Letterpress Cinematype Prints 0-9 available at SMUG here.

 

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Brass Foiled Notebooks available at SMUG here.

 

We also sell their jewellery and Cinematype prints. Can you tell I’m a big fan? It’s the SMUG exclusives above that I’m most proud of though. Kirsty and Pete design beautiful things and are lovely people that are a dream to work with. In order to give you a little more insight into the designers behind the studio, I asked them a few questions about their backgrounds, inspirations and design priorities.

 

 

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Tell us a bit about each of your backgrounds and how you came to be doing what you’re doing now?

 

We met and started working as designers in the early 1990’s and since then have worked across design disciplines, for small companies and big business, designing all kinds of stuff for lots of different people. Kirsty has worked in the fashion industry as a designer and visual merchandiser designing for small indie retailers and big stores like Top Shop. Pete set up the international design agency Uniform whilst still at university and in 2014 was shortlisted for the Design Museum’s Designs of the Year.

 

Tom Pigeon was formed after years of us working separately but always contributing to each others projects. As Tom Pigeon we design simple things for people to enjoy including prints, jewellery and stationery as well as taking on creative commissions and consultancy work. Our work is exhibited and sold across the world. We created Tom Pigeon to make the kind of things we would like to own and live with.

 

What are you most inspired by and which key elements of the Tom Pigeon studio most resinate with you personally?

 

We love clean design; Mid-century Modern, Brutalism and Minimalism but are equally inspired by our traditional, rural surroundings – colours and reflections in the sea, fishing boats, the structure and shapes of the local harbours.

 

It’s important to us that our products are carefully crafted, either by our team in the studio or by the amazing makers and artisans that we work with to produce our prints, jewellery and stationery.

 

If you had to choose one SMUG product what would it be?

 

HAY’s Wooden Spinning Tops – playful, colourful, simple.

 

 

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m.hulot – the interview

:: by Lizzie
M.Hulot Garrad and Gia

 

We are very pleased to announce that, after 6 years of hunting for just the right leather goods label to fit the SMUG aesthetic, we have found M.Hulot!

M.Hulot is a London based bag and accessories label, founded by accessories designer Anna Kreeger. Born out of a longing for purity in design, the label is a direct response to the throw away culture of the mass-market and an antidote to heavily branded designer goods.

 

Influenced by the stylishly attired, fictional Frenchman, Monsieur Hulot, the label reflects his struggles with the modern world and its increasing pace. M.Hulot harks back to traditional craftsmanship, quality and classic styling.

 

I was lucky enough to catch up with Anna in her beautifully located studio (Hornsey Town Hall Arts Centre) to hear more about her process and inspiration and to generally get all a bit excited about launching M.Hulot at SMUG.

 

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Tell us a little bit about your background and how you started out in the design world.

M. Hulot began as I was obsessed by purity in design, but had ending up working on trend led stuff for high street stores. I originally studied Fashion Design in Birmingham but, having worked for labels as diverse as Ella Doran, Zakee Shariff and Kate Sheridan, became more interested in product design and attention to detail.

 

Have you always worked with leather? What is it that you like about it?

Having studied fashion I always worked with cloth and was interested in beautiful weaves, linens and cotton, so I think there is a direct link between these fabrics and the natural leathers that I use. I love the depth and variation in veg tan leather. It has such character! I also enjoy its ‘preciousness’ and ‘luxury’, albeit in an understated way.

 

Your bags are well known for having such beautiful tones and colours. If you had to choose one tone/colour to best represent you what would it be and why?

That’s a really tricky one! Our best selling bags have definitely been our Howe and Gia bags in yellow. I think the colour just grabs people’s attention and they turn a rich and lovely mustard tone over time. However, you can’t really beat tan coloured leather – all the different shades and the way it ages makes me swoon!

 

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You have a growing number of shapes in your collection. What is your process and inspiration in creating these beautiful and classic looking bags?

Designing shapes is a very organic process. Over the season I’ll be constantly collecting ideas and taking things in, listening to customers and to friends, always on a quest for the perfect shape. I do love a practical day bag, so our new canvas styles are really important,  but our statement mini bags and clutches are our signature. They are bought as gifts a lot – that special something you wouldn’t always buy yourself. I keep both aspects in mind when designing.

 

Do you feel your work represents your personality?

Absolutely! I started M.Hulot as I was frustrated with not being able to express myself, designing for larger stores. M.Hulot as a whole is my vision and I hope this comes through in every aspect of the label, from the designs and the finished product through to the branding and social media.

 

If you had to choose one Smug product what would it be?

I am a sucker for classic enamel ware and particularly like the tumblers. That Pigeon Grey next to the Pillarbox Red makes my heart beat a little faster!

 

M.Hulot Gia and Howe bags are now available at SMUG both in store and online. Watch this space for new colours and additions to the collection. I think I’ll be going for one of the Gias or Howes in Yellow (obviously!) – decisions decisions.

 

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lenneke wispelwey ceramics

:: by Lizzie
mr_right

 

New SMUG designer Lenneke Wispelwey founded her studio in 2008 in Arnhem. Her porcelain, pastel-coloured work is recognisable due to its geometrically patterned appearence. Wispelwey is also known for the use of different shades of one colour and for playing with the contrast between biscuit and glazed porcelain. Lenneke finds that a basic, simple approach to techniques and materials and a low-tech way of designing is vital to communicating her vision and her way of working. She prefers creating families of products because, as an only child, she always wished for a bigger family. Wispelwey feels her work should make people smile. We at SMUG are feeling very smiley about it and are proud to be representing Lenneke exclusively in London. Below is a short interview with Lenneke focussing on her new collection which is available now at SMUG.

 

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Your ceramics are well known for having such beautiful tones of one colour. If you had to choose one tone/colour to best represent you what would it be and why?

I think that would be a deep petrol tone. For me a colour with character
and a story. Like a chameleon, very versatile, in every light another
colour.

 

You have a lot of complex geometric shapes in your designs but talk about  a low tech approach to designing. What is your process in creating these beautiful and complex looking ceramics?

As a child I was fascinated by the overdecorated glassware in my
grandmothers cupboard, so this was my inspiration when i started this
collection. I started collecting this glassware from fleemarkets and
triftshops and created a glass library. I combine parts of the glassware
(that I cast) with new shaped forms. Old and new coming together.

 

Have you always worked with porcelain? What is it that you like about it?

What I love the most is the fact that you start out with water and powder and that a beautiful high quality product comes out of the kiln at the end
of the process.

 

Do you feel your work represents your personality?

Hmmm, good question. I think it does. My work arises from my crazy
collections, inspiration and chimeras. Also the colours are all mixed by
hand so sometimes reflect my mood at that moment during mixing.
All the facets that seem very complex are actually not that hard when
you take the time to find out more about it.

 

If you had to choose one shape from your collection at SMUG what would it be?

Hmmm I think that would be the little star vase. Beautiful as an object
but even more interesting when you put a lovely flower in there. A found
flower during a lovely walk in the park or just one from your garden.

 

 

Lenneke’s collection at SMUG has recently been featured in Elle Decoration and continues to be as popular with the press as it is with SMUG’s team and our regular customers. To see the Elle Decoration feature take a look at our news page here.

 

 

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illustrator interview – charlotte trounce

:: by Lizzie
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Do you use old school or new school tools when creating your work?

I try to stay as old school as possible, so I make all my work using pencils and paints, however I do have to touch up and arrange compositions on the computer.

 

Show and tell your piece of work. Describe your submission for Old School.

My submission for Old School is a gym-themed, illustrated alphabet. It’s colourful and fun, and perfect for teaching ABCs.

 

 

A-Z_smug

 

What is your creative process?

I start any new project by first gathering lots of beautiful imagery to help inspire me. I then grab a pencil and scribble down lots of ideas in my sketchbook, and once I have settled on an idea I develop it as much as possible, before working on the final artwork in acrylic and gouache paints. I tend to paint every little element separately and then work it all together on photoshop.

 

Does your work represent your personality?

I think my work and I are a good match.

 

Describe your studio space.

I recently moved into a great new studio space in Dalston, to work alongside lots of other illustrators and designers. My desk is still a little bare, I think I need some plants to brighten the place up.

 

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What’s your earliest memory of drawing/creating?

I’m not sure about my earliest memory, but in my last year of primary school my teacher would keep me in at break and lunch times to create extravagant displays for the classroom, such as a giant papermache spot cream tube when we were studying The Diary of Adrian Mole.

 

Did you have an imaginary friend?

No, but my sister and I were constantly playing imaginary games when we were younger.

 

Did you know at school what you wanted to be?

I think I always knew I wanted to do something creative. Other avenues I explored were wedding dress designer, cake decorator and architect.

 

What advice would you give now to your ‘old school self’?

Make the most of all the creative facilities school and art college offer and experiment as much as possible.

 

Smug’s colour is yellow. What colour best represents you?

I’d probably be a slightly dirty shade of red. I love colour, but something slightly more reserved.

 

If you had to choose one Smug product what would it be?

The green formica school desk please.

 

 

 

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As well as Charlotte’s A-Z print, SMUG sells a collection of her wrapping papers commissioned by Wrap Magazine.

 

illustrator interview – stacie swift

:: by Lizzie
STACIE

 

Do you use old school or new school tools when creating your work?

I use a bit of both. Pretty much all of my work starts out as a pencil, then pen, drawings. Once I am happy with the black and white drawn images I add colour and create compositions digitally.

 

Show and tell your piece of work. Describe your submission for Old School.

My submission to the Old School theme was a series of alphabet prints inspired by vintage flashcards. I think they are quite a good summary of my work as a whole; bright, bold and fun – and hopefully they are just as appealing to adults as they are to children.

 

ALPHABET copy

 

What is your creative process?

All of my work starts out as a rough idea in a sketchbook or on a loose sheet of paper. I’m not one of these people who have beautifully presented sketchbooks! Scribbled roughs are usually followed by some internet research for image references from which I begin to make pencil drawings. When I am happy with those I reproduce a final version of the drawing in black fineliner and scan the images into Photoshop to colour, edit and compose my finished artwork.

 

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Does your work represent your personality?

I’d like to think that my sentimental nature and sense of humour come across in my work so hopefully they are representative of those elements of my personality.

 

Describe your studio space.

My studio at the minute is a big white box! Having recently moved, the walls have yet to have any colour on them and nothing is quite finished. Eventually I’d like this studio space to have lots of well- designed storage and a bit more personality but for now it’s more function over style – though the view out on to fields, chickens and a horse more than make up for this!

 

What’s your earliest memory of drawing/creating?

When I was growing up, every Saturday we would spend the day with my Nanny Mary who lived a road away from us. She was a brilliant, straight-talking woman with a Scottish accent she never lost even though she’d spent 70 odd years in London. From the minute we could hold pens she was keeping us quiet by telling us to ‘draw a little man’ on the back of her placemats. I think the novelty of being able to draw on someone’s tableware made the creative process even more enjoyable.

 

Did you have an imaginary friend?

I don’t remember having an imaginary friend; my dad used to make up lots of stories about animals he’d met on his day at work and have me mesmerised for hours with their adventures so I think my imagination tend to stray toward characterful animals even then…

 

Did you know at school what you wanted to be?

When I was very little I wanted to be a hot dog lady. Then I wanted to be a journalist. Then a lingerie designer. I hadn’t even considered illustration as an option until I was almost 20 and when I was 23 that I went back to study illustration.

 

What advice would you give now to your ‘old school self’?

The advice I would give to my old school self would be to be more confident – and not to worry, it will all work out in the end!

 

Smug’s colour is yellow. What colour best represents you?

I think my colour is probably a teal blue. I use it a lot in my artwork and I think it’s a good strong colour that can be both sensible and a bit more fun.

 

If you had to choose one Smug product what would it be?

Argh, I find it so hard to limit myself to one. The vintage jumper toys are a long-time favourite though. Especially the pigs.

 

 

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SMUG was the first ever shop to carry Stacie’s work and we’re proud to have several exclusives designed for us by her. The Lizzie’s Favourite Things Mini Print Set pictured above, and our I Feel Smug Card can both be found in store and online.  Stacie is also running a workshop upstairs at SMUG, with Emma Block, called ‘Insiders Guide to a Career in Illustration’ and you can buy tickets here.

 

 

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illustrator interview – amy harris

:: by Lizzie
amy_studio

 

Do you use old school or new school tools when creating your work?

A bit of both! There’s lots of physical making involved so I use different old school tools and tend to sketch by hand.  My laptop plays a part in the process somewhere though, either for sourcing materials and props or making patterns / creating details to use in my work. It’s often photographed for the final outcome too which involves a bit of digital wizardry.

 

Show and tell your piece of work. Describe your submission for Old School.

I made 3 pieces based around graphs, pie charts and pencils. They all took inspiration from minimalism and graphics I associated with school. When I was at school I’d keep my pencils until they were sharpened right down. I’d end up with a pencil in every length. I thought there was something quite sculptural about this and tried to carry this idea through each piece, playing with how you might expect to see this type of imagery.

 

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What is your creative process?

I keep notebooks where I write down ideas and little thumbnail drawings. I’ll start with an initial concept and absorb information and visuals that inspire me. I normally try to take a step back from it and do something else, then come back to draw sketches and fine tune an idea. Once I start making I play around with the more specific design decisions as I go. If it’s for a client I’ll make more decisions before I start making. With personal work it tends to be more instinctive and less pre-planned.

 

Does your work represent your personality?

Probably certain parts. I think the work you produce is always going to be an extension of your personality and interests but if it’s for a commercial context that can make it less personal. I think the more self led, the more personality is probably seen in it.

 

 

Send in a picture of your desk now and describe your studio space.

I share a studio with a mix of photographers, prop makers, artists and designers. It’s an old NHS building in Hackney that was converted into a studio space known as The Dead Dolls Club. We have two studio cats called Louis and Cocoa who like to sit on laptops. My desk and walls are filled by objects that inspire me, scraps of ideas and visual experiments, a cactus, a wooden parrot and the usual mix of books, paper, pencils, and stationery.

 

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What’s your earliest memory of drawing/creating?

When I was in nursery we watched the junior school play of Roald Dahl’s Fantastic Mr Fox. Afterwards, we went back to nursery to draw pictures of our favourite parts of the story. I’ve still got my own very worn out version of the book from around that time when I became a bit obsessed with. That was probably the first book I can remember reading too!

 

 

Did you have an imaginary friend?

No.

 

Did you know at school what you wanted to be?

When I was really little I wanted to be a fireman and then a vet, but after that I didn’t have any clear ideas. Creative subjects were always important for me and it felt a natural progression. I decided to continue onto an art foundation so knew I wanted to do something in the creative industries. But I was never certain of what!

 

What advice would you give now to your ‘old school self’?

Don’t over think it.

 

Smug’s colour is yellow. What colour best represents you?

Light turquoise greeny blue – I’m not sure why, but it’s a colour I seem to be drawn to.

 

If you had to choose one Smug product what would it be?

Your dash-dot yellow bed socks – lovely pattern and I always have cold feet.

 

 

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Amy has also made by hand these Wooden Christmas Decorations for SMUG.  They are for sale upstairs at SMUG in The SMUG Christmas SHOP.

 

illustrator interview – lydia shirreff

:: by Lizzie
lydia_studio

 

Do you use old school or new school tools when creating your work?

I am old school. I work with my hands. Although if someone were to buy me a laser cutter I wouldn’t complain.

 

Show and tell your piece of work. Describe your submission for Old School.

My submission for Old School was a paper pencil case filled with colourful, patterned school bits. The kind of stationary you would save for best and probably not take to school because it would definitely get stolen by the naughty kid. I made it slightly larger than life-size to make you feel like a child again when you see it.

 

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What is your creative process?

I will usually start by drawing out a very minimal plan, then spend a long time constructing with a lot of trial and error. I change things quite a lot as I go along so it’s a very fluid, experimental process. It can sometimes be incredibly monotonous and tedious but the results are always worth it.

 

Does your work represent your personality?

I think it does to a certain extent, although I am naturally quite untidy. And impatient. And I don’t wear bright colours very often…

 

 

Send in a picture of your desk now and describe your studio space.

My studio space is also my bedroom in a vacant office in East London. I was lucky enough to bag the conference room and table which is now my desk. It’s 9 feet long which is awesome in theory but actually just means I cover it in more mess. I like being surrounded by stuff, not necessarily my own work, but this is kind of unavoidable. Empty space makes me uncomfortable.

 

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What’s your earliest memory of drawing/creating?

I think for me it would be hard to find an early memory that wasn’t drawing or creating. One of my favourites was to make tiny little books. My mum and I found a whole box of them in the attic recently. They would invariably be about a blonde princess and a unicorn.

 

 

Did you have an imaginary friend?

I am an only child so I had a whole army of imaginary friends for different situations. We would have adventures in the field behind my parents’ house.

 

 

Did you know at school what you wanted to be?

Not really. I guess I knew I’d like to be creative at something. For a while I wanted to write stories I think.

 

What advice would you give now to your ‘old school self’?

Don’t worry. One day your individuality will be interpreted as cool. Don’t hide it.

 

Smug’s colour is yellow. What colour best represents you?

I’m a big fan of cobalt blue.

 

If you had to choose one Smug product what would it be?

I can’t help touching the blankets every time I pop in.

 

 

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Lydia has also made by hand these stunning Geometric Christmas Decorations for SMUG. Each one is unique and very beautiful. They are for sale upstairs at SMUG in The SMUG Christmas SHOP.

 

 

illustrator interview – linus kraemer

:: by Lizzie
Linus Promo Pic

 

Do you use old school or new school tools when creating your work?

I use a bit of both. My prints always start as sketches or doodles, and then I often redraw them as vectors on the computer.

 

Show and tell your piece of work. Describe your submission for Old School.

The playground print is a celebration of the playgrounds of my childhood – some still exist around the city but they’re rare now. I spent a lot of time finding photographs and looking for actual playgrounds so I could get the drawings accurate to the real thing. In the end I contacted Wicksteed Leisure (who’s name you’ll find on lots of playground equipment) and they sent me scans from their super retro catalogue from the 70’s.

 

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What is your creative process?

Although my prints look really simple they are usually tons of work. I go through lots of trial and error trying out all kinds of options in the most basic things like colour and layout until I’m happy that I’ve chosen the best version.

 

Does your work represent your personality?

I’m sure it does in many ways. I suppose I’m quite accurate in life in general!

 

 

Send in a picture of your desk now and describe your studio space.

My studio contains my computer and a desk, lots of different paper stocks, a nice printer and scanner, some music equipment. And some clothes and a bed.

 

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What’s your earliest memory of drawing/creating?

I loved trains (esp Thomas the Tank Engine) and drew train tracks a lot. I used to love looking out the window from the train at the curves of junctions where the tracks joined.

 

 

Did you have an imaginary friend?

Nope

 

 

Did you know at school what you wanted to be?

I wanted to be an architect. I think that was just because I liked drawing maps and plans of things. I had no interest in designing buildings!

 

What advice would you give now to your ‘old school self’?

Just get on with it.

 

Smug’s colour is yellow. What colour best represents you?

Gotta be dark blue, a bit like Pantone 541C.

 

If you had to choose one Smug product what would it be?

Can I have one of the formica cupboards please?

 

illustrator interview – fiona biddington

:: by Lizzie
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Do you use old school or new school tools when creating your work?

All my illustrations are hand drawn. I draw the main image in pencil and then layer up each colour on a separate piece of paper using a light box. This means I can be as messy and scribbly as I want and the colours don’t just merge into a giant mess. Then everything gets scanned and layered up in photoshop.

 

Show and tell your piece of work. Describe your submission for Old School.

My Old School pieces are a set of 7 limited edition prints from my ‘When We Were Young’ illustration series. I reckon ‘Hobby Horse’ has to be my favourite. I have great memories of trotting down our street as a kid on the hobby horse my mum made me out of a broom and one of my dad’s old socks.

 

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What is your creative process?

I start with an idea, often a word or sentence, then research around it and begin to play with what I find.  My best work happens when I don’t think too much, when I let the design just happen naturally.

 

Does your work represent your personality?

I’ve never thought about it. I reckon it must do or else I would’t be doing it.  I guess that’s why artists/illustrators do self-initiated work in our spare time. Working on something that you really care about reminds you of what you like about your work.

 

 

Send in a picture of your desk now and describe your studio space.

At the moment I’m living out of a teeny tiny room in London.  I can sit my desk and reach all four walls or if i get bored of that I can lie in bed and still work at my desk. It’s… cosy, if nothing else!

 

fb_desk

 

What’s your earliest memory of drawing/creating?

Drawing has always been my favourite thing to do. I was constantly drawing and colouring as a child. I was a bit slow at learning to read so I would just spend hours gazing at the pictures, re-drawing my own versions and making up my own stories instead.

 

 

Did you have an imaginary friend?

Doesn’t everyone?! I had numerous imaginary friends, from all the different imaginary worlds which I dreamt up whilst drawing.

 

 

Did you know at school what you wanted to be?

I always wanted to be an illustrator when I was young.  I would make my own books full of stories and pictures.  I would meticulously colour everything which could be coloured. There was a period where I changed direction for a while as I had no idea how to get there but now I’m in it for the long haul…

 

What advice would you give now to your ‘old school self’?

Illustration as a whole seems to have grown so much since I was at school.  I remember a career day where I was told my options were either children’s book illustration or editorial cartoons for newspapers. These days everything is illustrated; there are so many more options and the range of styles out there is phenomenal. I guess I’d tell myself not to be put off by those first stuffy teachers who told me illustration wasn’t a proper job.

 

Smug’s colour is yellow. What colour best represents you?

Hmmm, white. A confusion of nothing and everything.

 

If you had to choose one Smug product what would it be?

I love Matt Pugh’s wooden owls. I’d like a whole clan of them!